👋 Welcome to Lil’Log

Hi, this is Lilian. I’m documenting my learning notes in this blog. Besides, I’m leading a team working on practical AI safety and alignment at OpenAI. Based on the number of grammar mistakes in my posts, you can tell how much ChatGPT is involved 😉.

Extrinsic Hallucinations in LLMs

Hallucination in large language models usually refers to the model generating unfaithful, fabricated, inconsistent, or nonsensical content. As a term, hallucination has been somewhat generalized to cases when the model makes mistakes. Here, I would like to narrow down the problem of hallucination to cases where the model output is fabricated and not grounded by either the provided context or world knowledge. There are two types of hallucination: In-context hallucination: The model output should be consistent with the source content in context....

Date: July 7, 2024 | Estimated Reading Time: 30 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Diffusion Models for Video Generation

Diffusion models have demonstrated strong results on image synthesis in past years. Now the research community has started working on a harder task—using it for video generation. The task itself is a superset of the image case, since an image is a video of 1 frame, and it is much more challenging because: It has extra requirements on temporal consistency across frames in time, which naturally demands more world knowledge to be encoded into the model....

Date: April 12, 2024 | Estimated Reading Time: 20 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Thinking about High-Quality Human Data

[Special thank you to Ian Kivlichan for many useful pointers (E.g. the 100+ year old Nature paper “Vox populi”) and nice feedback. 🙏 ] High-quality data is the fuel for modern data deep learning model training. Most of the task-specific labeled data comes from human annotation, such as classification task or RLHF labeling (which can be constructed as classification format) for LLM alignment training. Lots of ML techniques in the post can help with data quality, but fundamentally human data collection involves attention to details and careful execution....

Date: February 5, 2024 | Estimated Reading Time: 21 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Adversarial Attacks on LLMs

The use of large language models in the real world has strongly accelerated by the launch of ChatGPT. We (including my team at OpenAI, shoutout to them) have invested a lot of effort to build default safe behavior into the model during the alignment process (e.g. via RLHF). However, adversarial attacks or jailbreak prompts could potentially trigger the model to output something undesired. A large body of ground work on adversarial attacks is on images, and differently it operates in the continuous, high-dimensional space....

Date: October 25, 2023 | Estimated Reading Time: 33 min | Author: Lilian Weng

LLM Powered Autonomous Agents

Building agents with LLM (large language model) as its core controller is a cool concept. Several proof-of-concepts demos, such as AutoGPT, GPT-Engineer and BabyAGI, serve as inspiring examples. The potentiality of LLM extends beyond generating well-written copies, stories, essays and programs; it can be framed as a powerful general problem solver. Agent System Overview In a LLM-powered autonomous agent system, LLM functions as the agent’s brain, complemented by several key components:...

Date: June 23, 2023 | Estimated Reading Time: 31 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Prompt Engineering

Prompt Engineering, also known as In-Context Prompting, refers to methods for how to communicate with LLM to steer its behavior for desired outcomes without updating the model weights. It is an empirical science and the effect of prompt engineering methods can vary a lot among models, thus requiring heavy experimentation and heuristics. This post only focuses on prompt engineering for autoregressive language models, so nothing with Cloze tests, image generation or multimodality models....

Date: March 15, 2023 | Estimated Reading Time: 21 min | Author: Lilian Weng

The Transformer Family Version 2.0

Many new Transformer architecture improvements have been proposed since my last post on “The Transformer Family” about three years ago. Here I did a big refactoring and enrichment of that 2020 post — restructure the hierarchy of sections and improve many sections with more recent papers. Version 2.0 is a superset of the old version, about twice the length. Notations Symbol Meaning $d$ The model size / hidden state dimension / positional encoding size....

Date: January 27, 2023 | Estimated Reading Time: 46 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Large Transformer Model Inference Optimization

[Updated on 2023-01-24: add a small section on Distillation.] Large transformer models are mainstream nowadays, creating SoTA results for a variety of tasks. They are powerful but very expensive to train and use. The extremely high inference cost, in both time and memory, is a big bottleneck for adopting a powerful transformer for solving real-world tasks at scale. Why is it hard to run inference for large transformer models? Besides the increasing size of SoTA models, there are two main factors contributing to the inference challenge (Pope et al....

Date: January 10, 2023 | Estimated Reading Time: 9 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Some Math behind Neural Tangent Kernel

Neural networks are well known to be over-parameterized and can often easily fit data with near-zero training loss with decent generalization performance on test dataset. Although all these parameters are initialized at random, the optimization process can consistently lead to similarly good outcomes. And this is true even when the number of model parameters exceeds the number of training data points. Neural tangent kernel (NTK) (Jacot et al. 2018) is a kernel to explain the evolution of neural networks during training via gradient descent....

Date: September 8, 2022 | Estimated Reading Time: 17 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Generalized Visual Language Models

Processing images to generate text, such as image captioning and visual question-answering, has been studied for years. Traditionally such systems rely on an object detection network as a vision encoder to capture visual features and then produce text via a text decoder. Given a large amount of existing literature, in this post, I would like to only focus on one approach for solving vision language tasks, which is to extend pre-trained generalized language models to be capable of consuming visual signals....

Date: June 9, 2022 | Estimated Reading Time: 25 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Learning with not Enough Data Part 3: Data Generation

Here comes the Part 3 on learning with not enough data (Previous: Part 1 and Part 2). Let’s consider two approaches for generating synthetic data for training. Augmented data. Given a set of existing training samples, we can apply a variety of augmentation, distortion and transformation to derive new data points without losing the key attributes. We have covered a bunch of augmentation methods on text and images in a previous post on contrastive learning....

Date: April 15, 2022 | Estimated Reading Time: 28 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Learning with not Enough Data Part 2: Active Learning

This is part 2 of what to do when facing a limited amount of labeled data for supervised learning tasks. This time we will get some amount of human labeling work involved, but within a budget limit, and therefore we need to be smart when selecting which samples to label. Notations Symbol Meaning $K$ Number of unique class labels. $(\mathbf{x}^l, y) \sim \mathcal{X}, y \in \{0, 1\}^K$ Labeled dataset. $y$ is a one-hot representation of the true label....

Date: February 20, 2022 | Estimated Reading Time: 22 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Learning with not Enough Data Part 1: Semi-Supervised Learning

When facing a limited amount of labeled data for supervised learning tasks, four approaches are commonly discussed. Pre-training + fine-tuning: Pre-train a powerful task-agnostic model on a large unsupervised data corpus, e.g. pre-training LMs on free text, or pre-training vision models on unlabelled images via self-supervised learning, and then fine-tune it on the downstream task with a small set of labeled samples. Semi-supervised learning: Learn from the labelled and unlabeled samples together....

Date: December 5, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 26 min | Author: Lilian Weng

How to Train Really Large Models on Many GPUs?

[Updated on 2022-03-13: add expert choice routing.] [Updated on 2022-06-10]: Greg and I wrote a shorted and upgraded version of this post, published on OpenAI Blog: “Techniques for Training Large Neural Networks” In recent years, we are seeing better results on many NLP benchmark tasks with larger pre-trained language models. How to train large and deep neural networks is challenging, as it demands a large amount of GPU memory and a long horizon of training time....

Date: September 24, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 21 min | Author: Lilian Weng

What are Diffusion Models?

[Updated on 2021-09-19: Highly recommend this blog post on score-based generative modeling by Yang Song (author of several key papers in the references)]. [Updated on 2022-08-27: Added classifier-free guidance, GLIDE, unCLIP and Imagen. [Updated on 2022-08-31: Added latent diffusion model. [Updated on 2024-04-13: Added progressive distillation, consistency models, and the Model Architecture section. So far, I’ve written about three types of generative models, GAN, VAE, and Flow-based models. They have shown great success in generating high-quality samples, but each has some limitations of its own....

Date: July 11, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 32 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Contrastive Representation Learning

The goal of contrastive representation learning is to learn such an embedding space in which similar sample pairs stay close to each other while dissimilar ones are far apart. Contrastive learning can be applied to both supervised and unsupervised settings. When working with unsupervised data, contrastive learning is one of the most powerful approaches in self-supervised learning. Contrastive Training Objectives In early versions of loss functions for contrastive learning, only one positive and one negative sample are involved....

Date: May 31, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 39 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Reducing Toxicity in Language Models

Large pretrained language models are trained over a sizable collection of online data. They unavoidably acquire certain toxic behavior and biases from the Internet. Pretrained language models are very powerful and have shown great success in many NLP tasks. However, to safely deploy them for practical real-world applications demands a strong safety control over the model generation process. Many challenges are associated with the effort to diminish various types of unsafe content:...

Date: March 21, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 23 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Controllable Neural Text Generation

[Updated on 2021-02-01: Updated to version 2.0 with several work added and many typos fixed.] [Updated on 2021-05-26: Add P-tuning and Prompt Tuning in the “prompt design” section.] [Updated on 2021-09-19: Add “unlikelihood training”.] There is a gigantic amount of free text on the Web, several magnitude more than labelled benchmark datasets. The state-of-the-art language models (LM) are trained with unsupervised Web data in large scale. When generating samples from LM by iteratively sampling the next token, we do not have much control over attributes of the output text, such as the topic, the style, the sentiment, etc....

Date: January 2, 2021 | Estimated Reading Time: 42 min | Author: Lilian Weng

How to Build an Open-Domain Question Answering System?

[Updated on 2020-11-12: add an example on closed-book factual QA using OpenAI API (beta). A model that can answer any question with regard to factual knowledge can lead to many useful and practical applications, such as working as a chatbot or an AI assistant🤖. In this post, we will review several common approaches for building such an open-domain question answering system. Disclaimers given so many papers in the wild:...

Date: October 29, 2020 | Estimated Reading Time: 33 min | Author: Lilian Weng

Neural Architecture Search

Although most popular and successful model architectures are designed by human experts, it doesn’t mean we have explored the entire network architecture space and settled down with the best option. We would have a better chance to find the optimal solution if we adopt a systematic and automatic way of learning high-performance model architectures. Automatically learning and evolving network topologies is not a new idea (Stanley & Miikkulainen, 2002). In recent years, the pioneering work by Zoph & Le 2017 and Baker et al....

Date: August 6, 2020 | Estimated Reading Time: 32 min | Author: Lilian Weng